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You have two candidates. Which is more important when selecting: skills or attitude?

You have two candidates and one position. Assume they are equal in all areas except skill and attitude and in these areas they are close. One candidate has slightly stronger skills and the other a more positive attitude. How should you select? a. Hire the candidate with better skills b. Hire the candidate with better attitude
By: Guest
Date: Wed-Feb-17-2016-
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Depends what the position is. A doctor or engineer don't need a chipper attitude, a salesman does.
[d] By: Guest
Date: Thu-Feb-18-2016
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Given the scenario you describe for your question, I'm assuming the better skilled candidate doesn't have a perceived attitude problem - the other candidate just has a "more positive" attitude as you put it. If this is case, and I feel the better skilled candidate will be a suitable fit for the project/team, then I would go for the extra skills. Otherwise I would go for the more positive attitude. In my experience "up-skilling" an employee usually has a better outcome than trying to correct an attitude problem.
[d] By: Guest
Date: Thu-Feb-18-2016
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Skills, hands down. Without the skills, one cant do the job. We might be able to live with the attitude. :) A sales person may have great attitude, but without sales skill, wont do be able to do the job for sure. IT personnel often get stereo types as not being people persons, or having bad attitude. But we often overlook it because of their skills. Most have even met doctors and nurses with bad attitudes, but grateful anyway, because of their skill.
[d] By: Guest
Date: Thu-Feb-18-2016
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Attitude always wins. You can always train for skill. But attitude is hard to change.
[d] By: Guest
Date: Thu-Feb-18-2016
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B. Attitude. It is worth the training expense. A bad attitude will bring morale down in a business. Companies are changing and need more flexible people today. If you have a person with yesterday's education they need the emotional intellect to not rely on that for the future of the business. The skilled labor can be a accomplished by investing in training and pairing them with other flexible leaders. Accepting a lesser attitude is a big oversight. If you have perfectly skilled employees who don't accept change or refuse to go with new trends and direction, then you have a solid stagnant company with no flexibility to grow in order to keep up with your competition. If you don't value training enough to dedicate a good percentage of your budget to then where are you spending? Marketing, wages, recruiting..? Employees with skills can be bid out from under you as they are less likely to remain loyal. After all they are deserving of the best, right? You have to account for that turnover as as expense. You cannot expect raises and your brand to keep a person with expected skills. Show a candidate with a great attitude how to become an asset to your business and you will see your bottom line improve. If you don't, your competition will fit it on their budgets and come out ahead of you in the end.
[d] By: Guest
Date: Thu-Feb-18-2016
Response
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b. Hire the candidate with better attitude
Having an employee with attitude adds more stress to your work load in the long run.This employee will also turn out to be a bad apple later on when they don't get their way or when you have to reprimand.
[d] By: Guest
Date: Thu-Feb-18-2016
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Give me Attitude every time. The saying "Ordinary People - Extraordinary Results" usually holds true. Say we're trying to find a cure for some disease, and we've got all kinds of tools and textbooks available, it's the person who says "I will find the cure" that you want on your side. That person will toss aside the word can't be done.
[d] By: Guest
Date: Thu-Feb-18-2016
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Attitude hands down, even the most highly skilled will turn people off with the wrong approach. It's tough to understand the advice of a doctor who cannot seem to speak in understandable language, listen to a patient, look them in the eye or empathize in any way.
[d] By: Guest
Date: Thu-Feb-18-2016
Response
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Absolutely attitude. Given multiple candidates have the requisite level of skills to do the job, I always go for the person with the better attitude.If the individual has a positive attitude about learning and change, they will be considered. If they do not, I don't care how many years of experience they have, what education is in their background or where they have worked, they will not be considered,WHY? Because the job for which I am hiring them today is likely not the job I will need them to perform in the near future ---- and I don't even know what that new job is.With the rate of change and the speed of business today. flexibility, agility and seeing change as an opportunity and not a threat is essential for organizational and individual success.
[d] By: Guest
Date: Thu-Feb-18-2016
Response
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Like others my experience is that unless the position requires a bona fide "expert" I would go with competency and a great attitude. I can teach skills to a willing candidate with baseline competency, changing someone's core attitude is much more difficult.
If you look at the research people who are committed and aligned to a value proposition outperform people with just strong technical skills.
We have developed a technical or "systems" bias which is why we are bleeding billions in lost opportunity. The power of true engagement generates that ....
The latest literature in health care demonstrates that the "connection" factor between caregiver and patient is much more critical in both healing and patient satisfaction than previously perceived.
[d] By: Guest
Date: Thu-Feb-18-2016
Response
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I believe that a great attitude can navigate through waters that skills alone are not be able to. That applies to any position in any industry.
[d] By: Guest
Date: Thu-Feb-18-2016
Response
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I would say attitude wins. However, what about professions where skills/technical knowledge is key? If I'm having open heart surgery, I don't want a doctor who has only performed it once but they have a great attitude?
[d] By: Guest
Date: Thu-Feb-18-2016
Response
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I would have to agree with attitude. It's how they present themselves and their information that makes them stand out. If you have two people presenting the same information it's their attitude and how they actually present it that makes them stand out and more memorable.
[d] By: Guest
Date: Thu-Feb-18-2016
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0
Don't disagree Tiffany, but that really isn't a case of an applicant or candidate, but rather a real subject matter expert.
[d] By: Guest
Date: Thu-Feb-18-2016
Response
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The problem is, not enough HR professionals communicate "how" candidates are selected for hire. I see many people cringe and speak negatively about behavioral and "outside the box" interview questions because they feel we should be focused on their skills and ability to the job. Most applicants don't understand how we use those questions in the evaluation process. More often than not, applicants believe it is their "skills" that get them the job. I try to educate folks as much as I can about how we truly evaluate talent. Soo many think even interviewing with HR is a waste of time because we "don't understand the job or skills required to perform the job." The example I use with folks when discussing "fit" vs "skill" is this....."In my years of experience in HR, most employee relations problems are not related to one's ability to perform. They have been related to issues in getting along with their manager and/or peers." Amongst one another, we understand "attitude" vs "skill" but when discussing with those who are job seekers or even hiring managers who don't get it, we need to really explain what that means. I still want a world renowed heart surgeon with a bad attitude over a newbie! LOL
[d] By: Guest
Date: Thu-Feb-18-2016
Response
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Depends; it flip-flops. Once minimal functional skill levels have been met, then you go for attitude, because that is the leverage for the KSA applications. Without adequate skills, your wannabe pilots, amateur surgeons and untrained pistol-packers will kill you, despite their superlative attitudes. With adequate initial skills and a good attitude, they can master more advanced skills more easily than they can improve their attitudes. Most people could do their jobs if their lives depended on it (the Mager/Pipe standard) but fall short due to other issues unrelated to skill: such as poor communications, bad feedback, obstacles, task interference, lack of practice, inadequate resources, improper balance of consequences, etc. Education is rarely the solution to poor performance because failures are usually not caused by skill deficiencies. And the best attitude in the world can't always prevail against impossible situations, either.
[d] By: Guest
Date: Thu-Feb-18-2016
Response
0
HiIt depends on your business. Well I prefer the SKILLS.Thanks.
[d] By: Guest
Date: Thu-Feb-18-2016
Response
What is 1 + 100



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