which is better the lift heavy weight or lift lighter weights and do more?

Date: Fri-Nov-22-2013-
Response
0
1. The body adapts to the specific stimuli it is exposed to. If weights are heavy, muscles and bones become stronger. Strength and bone density are far more important for health than muscular endurance. Leg strength is also an independent predictor of lifespan (Newman 2006 J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci).
2. Lighter weights will not train the fast-twitch motor units that people lose with age. With the loss in these strong, powerful motor units, people gradually their ability to live independently. (Dr. Phillips disagrees with this - he believes that with exercise-induced failure, one recruits higher-threshold motor units).
2. Total work = load lifted * number of repetitions. A higher load will increase total work just as more repetitions will. A higher load also increases the post-exercise increase in energy metabolism (the primary manner in which RT burns fat) more than low-intensity will (Thornton MSSE 2002).
3. Fatigue from multiple, low-intensity repetitions results in decrements to proper form (Hooper 2013 JSCR), which is what results in injury. Heavy weight is not the primary concern for injury.
4. The most important point here, however, is that people should train in a variety of different intensities to develop different muscular abilities: strength (~3-6 rep zone), hypertrophy (~7-12), and power (light weights for few reps). In my opinion, this approach is also far more engaging over time.
[d] By: exemptions
Date: Fri-Nov-22-2013
Response
0
suggest doing both.
As we age, we need strength to perform daily tasks (lifting bags or concrete, moving the kids and grandchildren to a new home) as well as (for some) sports.
We need to be accustomed to lifting weight if we don't want to get hurt when we occasionally do.
We need muscular endurance to fell energetic and (for some) bike or hike that hill.
So my routine: Several sets of increasing weight of 6-8 reps until I reach the something less than the exertion suggested for younger folks, being careful to use proper form. Then I end it with a set or two at about 30 reps to make sure that my body remembers that it has gone to the gym. This, I have found, it is best way for me to make strength and fitness gains while avoiding injury - both in and out of the gym.
Not saying that this is the right way, but it seems to work for me.
[d] By: unseated
Date: Fri-Nov-22-2013
Response
0
This question CANNOT be answered without knowing the goals of the person who asked it! Do you want to just build muscle mass without regard for anything else? Build strength? Power? Speed? Endurance? Strength endurance? Depending on what you want to achieve, the answer would be different.

Lighter weights (around 60% of maximum you can lift) do result in some muscle growth, but gains will quickly plateau. This will help train endurance, though. If you want to develop strength, you need to lift very heavy weights (80, 90, or even 100% of your maximum) in order to stimulate neuromuscular coordination (recruitment of muscle fibers by the brain). And if you're seriously training, you'd want to vary your workout in cycles of different duration to maximize your performance at specific times - coinciding with when you're competing.

[d] By: punishments
Date: Fri-Nov-22-2013
Response
0
For someone that is trying to be fit and healthy, a variety of training techniques will give excellent results with minimal risk of injury. Combine one or two sessions per week with sets of 12 to 15 reps with high reps of light hand weights. This builds both strength and endurance and provides excellent toning and appearance. Add at least 2 hours per week of pure cardio, 3 is better. Increasing weight over time will continue to build strength, if that is what is desired. I don't do heavy power lifting because I'm not interested in getting super big as I value mobility and agility more. 

Form and technique are most important. Never throw or jerk weights. Use smooth continuous movement, fully extend and fully retract. Never use more weight than you can control.

Use a wide variety of training activities and techniques. Cross train. Do lots of different stuff. This will minimize repetitive stress injuries and increase overall fitness. The fitness classes at the better clubs are outstanding as they provide good routines, instruction and cross training. That's what I do and it works.
[d] By: gel
Date: Fri-Nov-22-2013
Response
What is 1 + 100

Just Updated::