Can different genes encode the same protein?

By: Guest
Date: Fri-Jun-5-2009-
Response
1
Yes, definitely. Different codons on mRNA can code for the same protein.
[d] By: Guest
Date: Fri-Jun-5-2009
Response
1
One gene cannot make different proteins.. One gene makes one polypeptide.. A protein can be just one polypeptide or can have multiple polypeptide subunits.. For example hemoglobin, the protein which binds and transports oxygen in red blood cells, is a protein composed of four polypeptide subunits.. Two of the subunits are alpha chains are two are beta chains.. So hemoglobin as a protein is coded for by two genes.. A gene which codes for the alpha chain and a gene which codes for the beta chain.. Other proteins are just composed of one polypeptide. So each gene makes its own polypeptide.. Different genes can make the same protein.. as in the haemoglobin example above.. But one gene cannot make different polypeptides or different proteins.. The only exception would be the production of antibodies but thats a little more complicated.. Antibodies neutralize microbes in the body.. There are many different types of antibodies.. The mRNA produced from the gene which codes for antibodies is cut and edited in different ways so when the mRNA is translated it produces different antibodies.
[d] By: Guest
Date: Fri-Jun-5-2009
Response
1
Actually, with alternative splicing, one gene CAN make different proteins.

If you means different genes in the sense of a different sequence of DNA bases, then yes, different genes can make the same protein. That's thanks to the redundancy of the genetic code - look up the wobble hypothesis for more information.

However, entirely different genes - those at different loci or on different chromosomes - don't make the same protein, as far as I know (but what do I know?). This might be incorrect, since retrotransposons can make copies of themselves and insert these copies into different parts of the genome. Not sure if retrotransposons actually code for anything, though.

[d] By: Guest
Date: Fri-Jun-5-2009
Response
What is 1 + 100

Just Updated::