what is a fun activity for a older blind woman who is not very mobile and cant read or write brail?

By: Guest
Date: 0000-00-00-00:00:00-
Response
2
Sign her up for a braille and mobility class. Get her in touch with someone who will TEACH her to read and write like she used to and TEACH her how to be mobile and independent, using a white cane and not needing to be lead or guided. I am blind, and I don't care how old or young you are. There is no excuse for sitting around, moping and doing nothing when you lose your eyesight. It's fine to be upset for a while. It's natural if you've been sighted all your life, but it should NEVER stay that way. She needs to learn the skills necessary to lead a normal, independent, and happy life, and if she tries it will not only give her something to do, but it will open up countless new doors. Take her to a National Federation of the Blind convention and let her make friends who are blind who can offer her support and encouragement. Sign her up with the library of congress so she can get braille books and ausio books. Take her to visit the NFB's centers for the blind all across the nation. Get her books about blind people who succeed at living active, normal, and healthy lives. Take her to classes to learn to knit, do ceramics, make origami, cook, and so on so that she can find a new hobby. Take her to a community pool to swim. I know blind people on swim teams who win national championships, sos wimming for fun is NOTHING to a blind person. Take her shopping and show her how to pick out clothes she likes by touch, then help her cut slits in the tags so she has a tactile system to determine what clothes match. Whatever you do, DO NOT let her contineue to mope over being blind and DO NOT let her continue to be dependent on other sighted people to do the every day things she once enjoyed.
[d] By: Guest
Date: 0000-00-00-00:00:00--
Response
2
Get her mobile! If she's young enough to travel (walking, wheelchair, whatever) she's young enough for orientation and mobility lessons. These are quite essential!

Get her reading! Braille is not the only option. As someone mentioned, moon works. The RNIB/NLB library service has a small but interesting selection of grade one moon books. Learning moon requires very little time and much less tactile discrimination- making it great for elderly people.

Audio books are also excellent and can be purchased or, sometimes, checked out from a local library or your national library serving the blind. The selection for audio books, in general, greatly exceeds what one might find in braille, and hands down is a million times better than what you'll find in moon.

Treat her like any friend you might have who is down and depressed- take her out for a film she'd like, go to the bookstore together (one with audio books), walk around in the mall, go to a museum (especially touch-friendly ones! The art institute, for example, has a touch-friendly exhibit and audio-based descriptions of the art in every room using a small hand-held device)... basically, get around- it's the best 'cure' for feeling down.

[d] By: Guest
Date: 0000-00-00-00:00:00--
Response
2
She can take up the piano...get her a keyboard. She can re-learn to cook. She can socialize with new people...if she is still shy about her condition she can join a support group (see below). There are still books on tape. She can play chess with a special board. There is lots she can do...I used to take care of a guy who was in the same situation...except he was also mute (autistic), mentally retarded and diabetic. What do you do with that? I used to take him out on walks... people would stare because I had to hold his hand...he was about 30 years older than me and black but who cares what other people think? Take that woman out to smell the roses..she can still go to the beach and feel the sand between her toes.
[d] By: Guest
Date: 0000-00-00-00:00:00--
Response
What is 1 + 100

Just Updated::